The Collective Studio 2021-22 is open for applications! Deadline Thursday 15 July

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Taya Franco

My practice is a multi-faceted one – it encompasses many things I want (but struggle) to articulate and manifests itself in various forms; some ephemeral and transitory, others (seemingly) robust and manufactured. I work with ceramics, glass, metal and wood but also words, sound and performance. More recently, I have begun to experiment with digital art as an inextricable facet of my mostly sculptural installations. I view my drawing practice as part of my performance work, in which I attempt to embody something/someone temporarily – and drawing one vehicle for the immediate nature to my work. This extends to other elements of my work, which points to a non-presence inhabiting the spaces I create. I tend to use materials (or text) around the concept I wish to express at that time. As such, the connotations of materials are important to me and I frequently juxtapose earthly, transient stuff such as natural wood, wool and raw clay with slicker stuff like resin, Perspex and plasma-cut steel. These relationally atemporal materials are devices to elicit feelings of unease and unfamiliarity in the space.

I see my practice as collaborative and ongoing; never fully complete. I wish to highlight the importance of embodiment and of the female phenomenological experience being portrayed. At present, this is a phenomenology of constant surveillance and semiotic bombardment; I want to create a temporary autonomous zone in which the observer/participator feels this reflected on them, lending to them reflecting in on it. Telling these stories with this particular narrative is integral to my work. Storytelling as a whole, in fact, is integral to my work. What stories we choose to tell; which ones have been lost, how they are told, what they are really telling us intrigues me. The specific things I am interested in telling and transforming are (the loaded, colonised zones) of myth, anthropology, animism, queerness, ritual, permaculture and the Anthropocene. I hope to articulate my own feelings of alienation in this rapidly accelerating period in time, but, more hopefully, to expand and stretch the present (at least, my own).